<body><script type="text/javascript"> function setAttributeOnload(object, attribute, val) { if(window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }, false); } else { window.attachEvent('onload', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }); } } </script> <div id="navbar-iframe-container"></div> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> gapi.load("gapi.iframes:gapi.iframes.style.bubble", function() { if (gapi.iframes && gapi.iframes.getContext) { gapi.iframes.getContext().openChild({ url: 'https://www.blogger.com/navbar.g?targetBlogID\x3d9290871\x26blogName\x3d++::+GALLERY+::\x26publishMode\x3dPUBLISH_MODE_BLOGSPOT\x26navbarType\x3dSILVER\x26layoutType\x3dCLASSIC\x26searchRoot\x3dhttp://netgallery.blogspot.com/search\x26blogLocale\x3den_US\x26v\x3d2\x26homepageUrl\x3dhttp://netgallery.blogspot.com/\x26vt\x3d-799854796482506096', where: document.getElementById("navbar-iframe-container"), id: "navbar-iframe" }); } }); </script>

:: GALLERY ::

Saturday, January 01, 2005

NETSUKE SCULPTURE and forum



Attribute of japanese national suit.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::



Netsuke were used as clasps on kimono.


(pronounced "netskeh" and literally meaning "root for fastening") made their debut in late 17th-century Japan and on the traditional kimono, netsuke became artistic sculpture as their popularity increased.

In Japan strict rules of dress forbade ostentatious displays of wealth.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::




Netsuke were not subject to these laws because they were not technically clothing; nor were they subject to restrictions placed on art, where representations of religious matter were forbidden. As a result, no subject or material was off limits to netsuke artisans: Flowers, animals, and characters from No or Kabuki theater, religion, or mythology were carved from ivory, bone, wood, clay, lacquer, and precious metals.




::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::



While many netsuke remained plain and purely functional, wealthier Japanese displayed netsuke that were wearable art.

Thus, social status could be revealed through netsuke in ways it could not through dress. For a form of sculpture usually no more than three inches tall, netsuke played a sizable role in Japanese culture: functional, social, and aesthetic.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::



Gradually, gathering netsuke change in hobby in Japan not only, but also on the whole world.

Netsuke date back to the 17th Century, and became extremely popular in Europe towards the end of the 19th Century. This coincided with the Japanese adopting the suit and its pockets and with oriental artefacts being very much in vogue with buyers in western Europe. A huge supply of redundant netsuke came into Europe and were sold in many places as novelty items very cheaply. For the collector today there are many styles, and types, some by well known designers and the range in price can be incredible: from a few $/£ to £140,000 paid for a netsuke horse carved by Tomotada.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::



Netsuke served both functional and aesthetic purposes. The tradtional Japanese dress, the kimono had no pockets. The robes were hung together by a broad sash (obi), so items that were needed to be carried were held on a cord tucked under the sash. The hanging objects (sagemono) were secured with carved toggles (netsuke). A sliding bead (ojime) was strung on the cord between the netsuke and the sagemono to tighten or loosen the opening of the sagemono.The best known accessory was the inro, a small box used by the wealthy for carrying medicines and seals. Netsuke were also used to secure purses, and were widely used to hold the tobacco pouches that became almost universal with the introduction of smoking in Japan.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::



The quality of Netsuke was variable. As everyday objects many were carved quickly with left over materials. Netsuke could be made using a variety of materials mainly wood, and ivory (also shell, bone, horn, even metal and precious stones). Wealthier people would have finer netsuke, and it could be possible to tell the status of an individual by the quality of their netsuke. The workmanship is some is outstanding and despite their small size 1 to 2 inches, there can be considerable detail.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::



There are several types of netsuke including: manju, round or square button like boxes; and kagamibuta, comprising a metal lid and a bowl; and katabori. The range of subjects included all manner of animals, birds, the heores and villains from folklore, the immortals and mythical animals of Japanese legend, the grotesque and the amusing. The variety and variability of netsuke is a reason for their continued popularity today. Knowledgeable collectors look for compactness, a design that appears good from any angle, and the cord holes must not interfere with the piece and may often form part of it.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::



Anatomy of a Netsuke

Japan during the 17th century was a world without pockets. To carry medicines, tobacco, seals, and other small personal affects required one to hang them from their obi, or sash. From this need sprung various sets or kits, such as the tobacco pouch, the inro, and the yatate (writing set). The inro was a layered box with two to seven tiers that could contain various small objects. The inro was held together by braided silk cords, which ran vertically through the many layers. Keeping these braided cords together was an ojime, or bead, which finally ended in a toggle piece called a netsuke. The netsuke was tucked under the obi and helped to suspend the inro below. Through human nature, these elements began to serve as more than just their utilitarian use. They became expressions of the artist who created them and the individual taste of the wearer.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::




Although the Japanese did not have jewelry in the Western sense of the word, they most certainly knew about craftsmanship, artistry, decoration and adornment. These small sets of accessories became highly refined and reflected great sophistication. Inro were usually made of wood coated in lacquer, decorated with gold and silver inlays. Ojime and netsuke were crafted out of wood, ivory, ceramic or metal. A true inro suite would consist of an inro, ojime, and netsuke sharing a unified theme.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::




Just as women today covet their Prada bags and Manolo Blahnik shoes, inro suites were prized for their artistry and elegance. Rarely do we find the inro suites intact with their matching components. In the world of Japanese art, there are collectors who are drawn to the exquisite beauty of the inro boxes, which often demonstrate the most sophisticated lacquer work to be found. Bead enthusiasts marvel at the intricacy and refinement of the tiny ojime beads. Netsuke themselves are collected for their sculptural nature and ingenious miniature designs. Function provided the stage upon which Japanese artists could perform their magic.




::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::




As an artwork, netsuke are unique to Japan where, from the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries, they were worn as a part of the traditional Japanese clothing, the kimono. Because kimono have no pockets, small objects were carried in boxes, called sagemono (literally, "hanging object"). Sagemono took many forms: inro were lacquered cases for cosmetics, medicines, or seals, kinchaku were money cases, and tabako-ire were tobacco cases. The sagemono were suspended from a cord passed behind the obi, the sash holding the kimono closed. The netsuke served as the counterweight, attached to the other end of the cord, thereby preventing the sagemono from falling through the obi. . Lacquer art ( involving the sprinkling of gold and silver powder onto the surface) was extremely difficult; one inro could take years to be completed.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::




Netsuke figurines

Besides animals, the supernatural served as a popular source of inspiration in netsuke art. Traditionally, the Japanese loved ghost stories. Their mythologies and legends are filled with tales of ghosts and spirits. Ghosts are often depicted with long hair, flowing clothes, beckoning hands, and bodies trailing away in mists.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::




Along with ghosts, goblins, and other nasties, the Japanese mythos is also filled with supernatural creatures and gods who had greater or lesser powers for good or evil.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::




Netsuke were carved from all sorts of material, including ivory, sea shells, rock and wood. In the nineteenth century, from a piece of stag antler.

In form, there are five main types of netsuke, each measuring approximately one inch tall by one inch wide by one inch deep: manju, ryusa, kagamibuta, sashi, and katabori. Manju, ryusa, and kagamibuta are flattened sphere shapes. As you may have guessed, the manju netsuke is named after the Japanese confection that it resembles. The ryusa netsuke is similar in shape, but is hollow inside, and the design on either side is carved through to the center. Kagamibuta is more like a flattened round pumpkin, where the body is made of ivory and the lid is made of metal. With kagamibuta, the metal lid is usually incised with a design or inlaid with gold or silver to create a design in relief.

Katabori netsuke are carved completely in three dimensions, the carving detailing each part of the figure or subject. These are particularly collectible because of their detail and sculptural quality. Sashi netsuke are easy to identify by their elongated form. They are carved on all sides like the katabori, but are thin and almost seem to be stretched out. These basic shapes lent themselves to the function of netsuke as well as the materials available.

Remember, since they functioned liked oversized buttons, they had to follow at least a few practical rules. They had to have a means of attaching the braided silk cord (usually easily identifiable as two holes in the netsuke), and a compact and unobtrusive shape, which would allow a user to wear it easily without breaking it.



::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::




Collecting Netsuke

A good rule of thumb for any collection is to create one that you will enjoy. I have always delighted in seeing netsuke which show a special sensitivity to the natural material. Many netsuke-shi will take the natural variation of color or shape in the material to subtly enhance the carving itself.

There are others who are drawn to particular legends or the beauty of a specific substance, like ivory. On aspects of authenticity, it is generally agreed that netsuke created during the time that they were actually used (pre-1920s), are termed "real". Works created after this date were usually meant as tourist curios for export. There are a few noted master craftsmen who carried on the tradition during this time period and whose netsuke are considered to be of equal caliber to the antiques.

From the early 1980s until the present, there has been a flux of reproduction netsuke coming out of Hong Kong, Japan and the United States. These netsuke are most commonly identifiable by observing the inferior level of carving. They are quickly made with little finesse, but many "tricks" to make one believe there is great detail.

Another clue to its authenticity is its practicality. If the netsuke has protuberances that would make it an unwieldy item to wear, it's unlikely that it was truly intended for its function.

Netsuke by contemporary artists, however, is deeply rooted in traditional forms and often display a level of technical craftsmanship rarely seen.








::  VISIT THE GALLERY FOR UNIQUE CHESS TOOLS & COLLECTABLES::







M. Veneman
Rythmos Creative Advisory
The Netherlands

ChessEarthDotInfo

Enquire for large scale pictures
and
supplementary designs.

We are pleased to accept your order.


OFFICE@CHESSEARTH.INFO :: Email Protection by Name Intelligence




By pressing the *Traffic Mail* icon you can sent this article to your, or a friend's email address!! Easy to store your own chess references (press memorandum) or vitrines from the Gallery. The information you provide on this form will not be used for anything other than sending the email to you, or your friend. This feature is not to be used for advertising or self-promotion. Press the yellow square (left) and do not forget to save your memo. Leave your public remarks and your URL at the ShoutBox. Also visit the three Groups listed below and return to the current chapter with the return button !!

You may browse more articles from this chapter at the "Overview Articles" above. [<< BACK:] To Current chapter


  ::  !!!! !!!! !!!! !!!! BANKING WITH INTEREST PAYMENTS !!!! !!!! !!!! !!!!::